The Incredible Japanese Prison Break

Share
Embed
  • Loading...
  • Published on:  Tuesday, October 1, 2019
  • Support Kento Bento on Patreon: https://patreon.com/kentobento

    Download Dashlane for free to manage all your passwords: https://dashlane.com/kentobento
    Use the promo code "KENTOBENTO" to get 10% off Dashlane Premium.

    Other videos you may like:
    The Greatest Bank Heist in Japanese History: https://www.faceclips.net/video/gbeN-2ErxBw/video.html
    The Greatest Bank Heist in Chinese History: https://www.faceclips.net/video/qW0uzPJEO10/video.html
    The $1,000,000,000 North Korean Bank Heist: https://www.faceclips.net/video/Usu9z0feHug/video.html
    Why Japan's Great Pyramid of Giza Can't be Built Until 2110: https://www.faceclips.net/video/w7E6rdmilyE/video.html
    The Mysterious Chinese Art Heists Across Europe: https://www.faceclips.net/video/9LDVQYfeseo/video.html

    Help us with subtitles in your language!

    Stock Media Footage:
    Videoblocks: https://www.videoblocks.com

    Music:
    Epidemic Sound: http://epidemicsound.com

    Channel Description:
    We do videos on intriguing & thought-provoking Asiany topics, including stereotypes, history, culture & geography.

    Team KB:
    Research - Kento Bento, Isambard Dexter
    Script - Kento Bento
    Music - Jorrit van Ginkel
    Sound Effects - Eric Schneider
    Illustrations - Charlie Rodriguez
    Video Editing - Kento Bento
    Official Cheerleader - Nina Bento

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/kentobento2015
    Facebook: /kentobento2015
    Patreon: https://patreon.com/kentobento
    Business Inquiries:

    -----------------

    [The Incredible Japanese Prison Break]

    Aomori, Japan. 1936. Prisoner Yoshie Shiratori had had enough.

    He was forced to confess to a murder he did not commit, falsely imprisoned in Aomori Prison, beaten and tortured every night by prison guards, and, now worse, prosecutors were seeking the death penalty. In his mind, it was time to go; but Aomori Prison wasn’t the easiest to escape.

    Regardless, Yoshie Shiratori had nothing to lose, and so at 5:30 am he made his move. He knew there would be a 15 minute gap in the patrol time as he had studied the guards’ routine for months; and when the coast was clear, he pulled out a metal wire (which he had smuggled in from the bathhouse) and started to pick the lock. (This was originally the metal support ring that was wrapped around the bathing buckets inmates used to wash themselves).

    His hands were stiff from the wintry cold, but after a few minutes of picking, he had success, and his cell door swung open. But he wasn’t out of the woods yet, because there were more locked doors ahead. He knew he only had a few minutes left before the guards would return, and so he wasted no time attempting to pick his way through the remaining security doors.

    Now fortunately for him, he was able to make it out of the facility, but the bad news was that he was only halfway to freedom. You see, he was still well within the search perimeter, which meant at any moment the alarm could go off and he’d still be caught.

    At 5:45am the guards returned, peering into his cell; and this is what they saw - Shiratori sound asleep in his futon bed. ...
  • Source: https://youtu.be/oI8trlbCbU8
Loading...

Comment

  • Kento Bento

    Kento Bento

     2 months ago +17607

    *BONUS VIDEO: The Japanese Prison Break FOLLOW-UP: https://youtu.be/CUm7B2oUh9Y

    Fun Fact: The prison that Yoshie Shiratori ended up in at the end (Fuchu Prison) is the same prison that was referenced in the 300 Million Yen robbery that I covered in my previous video 'The Greatest Bank Heist in Japanese History'. This Japanese heist took place in 1968, which is 7 years after Shiratori was released from prison.

  • Jimu Rhew

    Jimu Rhew

     38 minutes ago

    Lento Bento:He had to sleep on the concrete floor
    Also Lento Bento*draws a bed*

  • Osmil Oe

    Osmil Oe

     59 minutes ago

    Man that transition to the ad was smooth

  • DisGotty

    DisGotty

     an hour ago +1

    Is he an anime protagonist

  • results of the remedies

    results of the remedies

     an hour ago

    I dont think it is a true story

  • Josla

    Josla

     2 hours ago

    This story is stranger than any fiction story, didn't believe it till I search the Internet to this miracle person: Yoshie Shiratori (白鳥 由栄 Shiratori Yoshie, July 31, 1907 – February 24, 1979) was a Japanese national born in Aomori Prefecture. His family name Shiratori means 'swan' in Japanese.[2] He had a wife and one daughter. He is famous for having escaped from prison four times. These prisons were one of the harshest ones. Such as being abused, wandering in mountains, etc. In total, he was sentenced to life plus 23 years for his crimes, but only served 26 years, and was paroled in 1961.[3]

    In 1933, he was apprehended on suspicion of murder and robbery, which he had not committed. Prosecutors had sought the death sentence. He escaped from Aomori Prison in 1936 using a length of wire which he found on wooden bathing buckets to pick the lock of his handcuffs. He was soon recaptured and sentenced to life imprisonment after 3 days. He escaped from Akita Prison in 1942 by scaling the smooth copper walls like a lizard and squeezing through an air vent in the prison's ceiling. He went to the home of a kindly guard from Aomori Prison for assistance but was rearrested when the guard alerted the police while Shiratori went to the toilet. Shiratori vowed to never trust officers of the law again. In custody again, three years were added to his sentence, and he was incarcerated in Abashiri Prison. In 1945 he weakened his solid steel handcuffs and the inspection hole on his cell door by rusting them with miso soup and by using his ability to dislocate parts of his body, he climbed thorugh the inspection hole and escaped again. He had found an abandoned mine in Hokkaido and made a fire. He lived off nuts, berries, and crab. He observed how the bears caught crabs and learned how to do the same. Then, he started to head to Sapporo. In 1946, a starving Shiratori tried to steal a tomato from a farmer, who mistook him for a local thief and attacked him. Shiratori fought back and accidentally killed the farmer in the scuffle, piercing his stomach, resulting in his arrest. Sapporo District Court sentenced him to death and placed him under 24 hour surveillance under six armed guards. To prevent a repeat of the last escape, he was put in a prison with air vents and an inspection hole smaller than his head, as his previous escapes involved him climbing out through the ceiling. This meant the floor construction of the prison was neglected, which a huge mistake. The guards checked his room daily while Shiratori took a bath. The guards were so confident that Shiratori wouldn't escape that they didn't bother handcuffing him, which turned out to be a huge mistake too. By this time, Shiratori was getting old, but he was desperate. He tricked the guards by constantly looking up for an escape plan, so that the guards would neglect checking the floor. In 1947, while awaiting execution in Sapporo Prison, he escaped by unbolting the wooden floorboards under his bed with cutlery and then digging his way to freedom with a bowl.

    In 1948 at the age of 41, Shiratori was exhausted, and after being offered a cigarette by a police officer, he was moved by this action of kindness and respect. He admitted that he was an escaped convict. The consequences were less harsh, as he willingly gave himself up and Japan's justice system was changing. The High Court of Sapporo felt sympathetic and dismissed the murder allegation and revoked his death sentence, as it was recognized as self-defense. They also took into account that in all 4 escapes, he did not hurt a single guard, despite the abuse he received under them. They revoked his death sentence and sentenced him to 20 years in prison. The court approved his request to be transferred to a Tokyo prison. He remained in Fuchū Prison until he was paroled in 1961. He went to Aomori Prefecture in 1973 and met with his daughter to tell his life story. Shiratori then lived another 10 years, supporting himself by doing odd jobs like building, farming, and compensated dating. He had also met another woman in 1971 and they had one son together. He died of a heart attack in 1979. His ashes were taken by a woman who had cared for him.

    Shiratori became an anti-hero in Japanese culture. Akira Yoshimura published a novel Hagoku based on him. A memorial to Shiratori is in the Abashiri Prison Museum.

  • nikita kuzub

    nikita kuzub

     4 hours ago

    Why is the lock inside the cage?

  • ธนภัทร กันประเสริฐ

    ธนภัทร กันประเสริฐ

     4 hours ago

    Thats spider man
    Reasons
    1.Can climb
    2.stregth
    3.flexible
    4.smart


    My theory is ver good :D
    No?
    Okay...

  • Danny Nguyen

    Danny Nguyen

     5 hours ago

    This almost sound fake

  • •pinku_ramen•

    •pinku_ramen•

     6 hours ago

    i feel bad for this dood

  • timmy D=

    timmy D=

     6 hours ago

    Its ashame, this guy was clearly incredibly intelligent. But he was forced to use that to achieve basic freedoms.

  • Issac Zhang

    Issac Zhang

     6 hours ago

    He's a secret member of the X-Men.

  • SR Videos

    SR Videos

     7 hours ago

    Man wants to see his wife and daughter but could only see one and could only see his daughter.

  • Abhishek Verma

    Abhishek Verma

     7 hours ago

    Caught stealing a tomato.

    Shiratori - Ah shit, here we go again.

  • I am Jafar

    I am Jafar

     7 hours ago

    I can't believe it is but a fairy-tale

  • YukiFN

    YukiFN

     8 hours ago

    Can we all just come to say what an awesome Segway

  • Jakob Gee

    Jakob Gee

     10 hours ago

    Dude was literally a fucking Pillar Man

  • Elijah Stephens

    Elijah Stephens

     11 hours ago

    THIS GUY IS LIKE A FRICKEN ANIME CHARACTER

  • Pyurified

    Pyurified

     11 hours ago

    Is this guy a anime protagonist

  • Mason Wu

    Mason Wu

     11 hours ago

    How good is this guy